Who’s welcome at the table?

Discussion, January 29   In many families, here’s the question that floats over the turkey at the Thanksgiving table: We may be a family, sharing a common history, but can people with radically different points of view carry on a civilized conversation?  Or do some people shout their strong opinions, trying to drown out their…

The Episcopal Church Welcomes You

Dottie Fuller and Gil Grady had been together for nine years before they came out to members of their church.  Their deacon told them, ‘We really need you to come out, so others will feel safe here…’  In the 1970’s – even in San Francisco – gay and lesbian visitors were asking, ‘Is it OK…

“What are we going to do now?” Week 3

Chapter 5 of A Thorn in the Flesh  introduces readers to two women who would become quiet leaders for a changing church (see p. 75): … In Placerville, California, a small town of 6,000 people, Gil Grady and Dottie Fuller, like many other gay and lesbian couples in the early 1980s, lived a quietly closeted…

Reflections on the discussion: Reading the Bible

Our discussion began with a short story from the previous Sunday morning.    A visitor dropped by St. Benedict’s and came into the Bible study meeting between the services.  She looked around the room and noted that the St. Ben’s women all had short hair, and asked, “Why do all you have short hair when…

Reflections on our discussion – January 9

We began our first session by talking about why each of us wanted to join this discussion. (Besides looking forward to thought-provoking conversations, several mentioned the chance to talk to the author of the book. For her part, Caroline Hall remarked that it’s difficult to talk about your own book!)

In or Out? Week 1 of Whatever Happened to the Church?

It was the Civil Rights movement that brought the Episcopal Church into political action for social justice. Before that, many politicians had been Episcopalians and there were activist clergy, but the Civil Rights movement prompted the national Church to take a role in protests. This was not a universally popular move – some people felt…